Neck Pain Pinched Nerve

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One of the great things about our website is that we get to help hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world, whether it is offering solutions to their pain, or answering their questions. In this article, we will be addressing one common question that we get in the neck pain section of our website.

That question is.. “Is my neck pain caused by a pinched nerve?”

First, let’s take a closer look at the very vague definition of a pinched nerve. A pinched nerve is described as a damaged or aggravated nerve or nerves. Not very helpful, right? Let’s put it this way, if you are experiencing prolonged pain, numbness and tingling in the neck… it is possible that you are dealing with a pinched nerve in the neck.

The pain from pinched nerves can also be felt in the upper back and shoulder area. This type of pain that travels throughout your body, away from the injured area, is called referred pain.

Most pinched nerves are temporary and can be treated without surgery. Of course, if the pain persists you will want to get checked out by a medical professional to rule out any serious injury.


Typical Treatments for a Pinched Nerve

Most people will be prescribed a muscle relaxer to help relieve the pain associated with the pinched nerves. You may also find relief from using ice or heat on the nerve area to reduce interior inflammation. You will find a short list of treatment options towards the end of this article.

What Causes Pinched Nerves in the Neck

There is no one particular cause of pinched nerves in the body. Many times a pinched nerve is caused by herniated discs in the neck or spinal arthritis. It is also common for athletes to have pinched nerves due to the redundancy of certain activities.

What to do about Neck Pain Pinched Nerves

Here is a short list of self care treatments you can use to try to get relief from pain associated with pinched nerves.

- Take a hot bath (optional sea salt)
Apply Ice or Heat
– Getting a massage (massage may help with the trigger points in your neck, that are contributing to your pain)
– Take an all natural anti inflammatory medicine
– Stretching Exercises (certain tight muscles in the upper back and neck can be causing your pain)

If the above treatment options do not work, you may want to schedule an appointment with your doctor. Keep in mind; if your doctor only gives you a prescription, you are only treating the symptoms of your pain not the true causes.

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