Heat and Back Pain

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7 Essential Tips for MAXIMUM Relief

heat and back painIf you ever experience back pain, you may instinctively reach for a hot water bottle, heating pad or even simply a warm blanket to provide soothing relief. As you might already suspect, heat has been scientifically proven to provide pain relief in people with low back pain.[i]

Studies show that heat receptors located at injury sites in your body can actually block chemical messengers that allow your body to detect pain. Heat has actually been shown to “deactivate pain at the molecular level in much the same way as pharmaceutical painkillers work.”[ii] That said, not all heat is created equal, so to maximize your relief you’ve got to know some key secrets about heat and back pain.

How to Maximize Your Back-Pain Relief Using Heat

7. Make Sure the Heat Level is Adjustable

Whether you’re using a heating pad or a heat wrap, it helps if you can adjust the level of heat you’ll receive. Obviously, if it’s too hot it can hurt your skin. If it’s not hot enough, you won’t get the relief you’re after.

6. Use the Heat for 15-20 Minutes

You’ll generally want to keep your back heated for 15-20 minutes at a time for maximum relief. This is why hot water bottles are not always the best option, as they lose their heat rather quickly. When it comes to heating pads, make sure yours has an automatic shut-off so there’s no worry about using it too long, falling asleep while in use, etc.

5. Avoid ‘Regular’ Heating Pads, They Offer Only Short-Lived Relief

The conventional heat given off by most heating pads will only warm the surface of your skin, offering only minimal, short-lived relief. Electric heating pads also give off electromagnetic fields (EMFs), which may interfere with body functions and, research suggests, may be linked to cancer and a weakened immune system.

4. Steer Clear of Cheaply Made Heating Pads

When you buy a low-quality heating pad, you get what you pay for; they only work half of the time, have multiple “hot spots” that burn your skin and many low-quality pads are also a very serious FIRE risk due to manufacturing errors that cause shorting within the wires.

3. Try Moist Heat

Moist heat, such as a hot bath or sauna, relieves pain better than dry heat for some people. It’s worth trying both methods to find out which feels best to you.

2. Pay Attention to the Heat Delivery Material

Most heating pads have fabric or plastic covers that do little to conduct heat. One of the best materials for heat transfer are actually Jade stones, as when the jade is heated, it transports the heat waves deep into your body to warm, soothe, cleanse and relieve your pain.

1. Use Far-Infrared Rays (FIR) for DEEP Heat

heat and back pain

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Far-infrared rays lead to vibration effects at the molecular level, which improves transportation of oxygen and nutrients, ultimately helping to support regeneration and healing.[iii] The thermal effect of deep heat on your tissues causes blood vessels in capillaries to dilate, which improves blood circulation and promotes pain-relief healing and wellness.

heat and back painFIR penetrates your skin as deep as 3 inches, compared to just 2-3 millimeters of other pads. This is why FIR heat is so completely different from conventional heat … and why FIR’s energy is able to reach deep into your body, zero in on your pain, and speed natural healing. Even better, because the heat is deep heat, the soothing relief lasts; it won’t just dissipate the second you turn it off.

Watch This Video Now to Find Out More About the UNMATCHED
Pain-Relieving and Healing Power of Far Infrared Heating Pads…

For deep, healing heat that acts on your tissues thermally, helping to soothe muscle aches and pains, LosetheBackPain.com’s Far-Infrared Back Pain Heating Pad just can’t be beat. Click here now to try it for 90 days RISK-FREE.

 

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