Exercise and Joint Pain: 7 Rules You MUST Follow

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exercise and joint painIf you struggle with joint pain, the last thing you may want to think about is exercise — but you absolutely should. In fact, exercise has been called the secret to joint pain relief,[i] because it breaks the tendency to favor your joints and avoid movement.

Such avoidance will ultimately make your pain worse and weaken your body (your muscles, your lungs, your heart — all will be negatively impacted by a lack of regular physical activity). Plus, lack of exercise may increase your risk of weight gain, and excess weight will also increase joint deterioration and pain.

So, if you have joint pain exercise is a must — but there are some important considerations you should know.

7 Top Rules to Know About Exercise and Joint Pain

7. Seek Professional Advice to Get Started

Depending on your severity of joint pain, there may be certain exercises that are not safe for you … and there may be others that are ideal. It’s a good idea to consult with a personal trainer and/or a physical therapist who can help you create a safe exercise plan.

6. Variety is Key

Exercising with joint pain is no different from any exercise program in that varying your activities will ensure your muscles stay challenged and you get the most comprehensive benefits. Activities such as stretching, tai chi and yoga can help to gently increase your flexibility and maintain normal joint movement while relieving stiffness. Pilates (and yoga) are excellent to build your core muscles while bicycling can help build your stamina.

5. Don’t Skip the Cardio

Regular aerobic exercise has been shown to help reduce joint pain and improve joint function,[ii] but many skip this form of exercise for fear that it will only stress their joints further. You may need to stick with lower-impact forms of cardio, like walking, swimming, water aerobics or bicycling, but don’t skip it entirely.

4. Be Sure You’re Doing Strength Training

It’s important to include strength training s in your workout routine, as this will help you to build the muscles supporting your joints, ultimately helping to lessen pain and improve function. You can use free weights, machines or even your own body weight to do strength training. For instance, simple body-weight activities such as squats can help you to increase your strength and boost your ability to perform daily movements, such as climbing stairs.

3. Warm Up Correctly

Start gradually and warm up using range-of-motion exercises or dynamic stretches, which mimic the exercise you’re planning to do (such as walking lunges). You can also apply a heating pad with far-infrared rays (FIR) prior to your workout to help your joints and muscles to relax, thereby relieving pain. You should start very slow and work up your intensity over time.

2. Use Ice Afterward

Icing your joints after a workout can help to reduce any swelling and keep pain to a minimum.

1. It Shouldn’t be Painful

It’s important to challenge yourself physically to get the most benefits from exercise, but you’ll want to avoid activities that cause actual pain, or definitely any pain that is worse than what you normally experience. This is where a professional can help you learn the best exercises to build strength and stamina without exacerbating pain. While some soreness after exercise is to be expected, if your pain lasts longer than two hours you may need to make your exercise program less strenuous.

Have You Heard About the Newest Breakthrough for Joint Pain?

exercise and joint painA regular exercise plan should be considered a key part of any joint treatment program — but so, too, should Super Joint Support. This blend of all-natural ingredients is designed to nourish, support and possibly even regenerate your joints, thanks to the hydrolyzed collagen type II and other joint supernutrients that it contains.

Click here to read more and find out why so many people say Super Joint Support is like “joint replacement in a bottle” …

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Comments

  1. LEN DOW says

    HI JESSE // I HAVE HAD YOUR BOOK ON BACK PAIN FOR 3 WEEKS NOW, I STOPPED USEING THE WEIGHTS & AM ENJOYING YOUR STRECHING EXERCISES,/// REALLY GREAT///& AM EATING MORE OF PROPER FOODS, I HAVE LOST 4LBS ONLY NEED TO LOSE 4 MORE, I FEEL GOOD I AM //79//SURE DONT FEEL LIKE IT//ANYONE WITH PAIN COULD SURE USE YOUR BOOK, FOR SURE// ITS GREAT//I AM SLEEPING BETTER TO//I AM LOOKIING FORWARD TO GOLF NEXT SPRING, LEN FROM THE GREAT WHITE NORTH, INNISFIL ONTARIO// THANKS A WHOLE JESSE//
    I SURE LEARNED A LOT FROM THE INFORATION ABOUT PAIN IN YOUR BOOK/ THANKS AGAIN

  2. Michael Chilton says

    Hi Jesse,
    I’ve only had your ’7-Day Back pain Cure’ book a few days and have just finished Chapter 8. Everything you say makes such good sense to me, and it all comes together so logically. I’m 74 and my back pain isn’t severe, but its steadily getting more troublesome. I’ve been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy which is particularly affecting my legs and feet and causing trouble with balance and walking for which I’ve been given exercises that are helping to strengthen the affected muscles, so I’m looking forward to discovering your advice on exercise in particular. For a start, however I will be increasing the amount of water I drink regularly as I have not been drinking as much as you advise.
    Many thanks,
    Michael

  3. Cindy O'Neil says

    my sister emailed me this article. in all the years i’ve had rheumatoid arthritis i’ve read much literature – and received much advice – on how to reduce pain. this article is great in that covers why, how and when with detail. it should be very helpful to those who take the time to read, and heed.
    much light,
    Cindy

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