Reflexology: Press Away Your Pain

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Ultra Powerful Pain Reliever (still legal)

 

A full quarter of all the bones in your body are in your feet – more than 50 of them. Take a closer look… straight down. There they are.

Maybe you’ve underestimated these two distinctive members of your body. On an average day you walk around and pound on them with an accumulated 1,000 tons of force. Talk about true workhorses. The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) considers your feet a marvel of engineering, too. According to their most recent estimates, the typical person walks about 8,000 to 10,000 steps a day – or over 115,000 miles during a lifetime. That’s like walking a circle around the entire earth a whopping 4 times!

No surprise then to discover your feet bear the answer to better health for your entire body through the miracle of reflexology. And that’s only half the good news. Your hands hold the other half of this ancient health secret.

How Reflexology Works

On reflexology charts, the body is reflected on the feet and / or hands. It serves as a map for technique application. The body is divided into 10 zones-five on each side of the body. Each organ (part of the body) is linked to areas on the hands or feet.

A person trained in reflexology can diagnose abnormalities in various parts of the body by feeling the hands or feet. This action stimulates the flow of energy, blood, nutrients, and nerve impulses to the corresponding body zone to relieve ailments in that zone. But even the layman with some basic instruction and a reflexology chart can benefit through self reflexology.

By applying pressure on pressure sensors in your hands and feet using specific thumb, finger, and hand techniques, your body reflexively responds to the stimulated area. This results in relaxation, improved circulation, and exercise of the nervous system among other benefits of touch for pain relief and healing in the reflected area. For example, massaging and applying pressure to an area which spans both heels can provide relief from sciatic
pain
.

From Ancient Medicine to Proven Science

Reflexology really isn’t a new discovery. Like many of today’s best natural paths to better health, reflexology has been around for quite some time. In fact, it was first practiced as early as 2330 B.C. by the Egyptian culture, as well as early Indian and Chinese people.

Foot reflexology as we know it today was revived in large part thanks to physical therapist Eunice Ingham. Two doctors she worked with had rediscovered how stimulating one part of the body can create a response in a distant part of the body, a practice they called Zone Therapy. Eunice built upon this knowledge to publish her groundbreaking book “Stories the Feet Can Tell” in 1938 which recognized how the feet contain a mirror image of the body in reflex points.

According to noted reflexologists Kevin and Barbara Kunz, numerous scientific studies repeatedly validate the immediate health benefits of reflexology. Besides merely zapping stress and increasing relaxation, their review of many controlled studies shows reflexology is also useful in mental health, cancer care, post-operative, childbirth and recovery, and general pain reduction applications.

Those who practice reflexology have found they can reduce their dependence on medications and, in a sense, reprogram the nerves in their body through touch to aid and complement virtually any healing process or medical treatment.

Patients with symptoms of coronary heart disease like chest distress and angina found symptoms disappeared with foot reflexology. They also enjoyed a related drop in blood pressure of as much as 25/5 after treatment – better results than their regular medicine offered.

Even growth patterns were positively affected through reflexology with mentally disabled children showing significant improvements in height, weight, and other health measures in a controlled study.

And these are results from just two out of hundreds of studies. The 1996 China Reflexology Symposium Report found foot reflexology to be 93.63% effective in treating 63 different disorders. What type of pain or disorder could reflexology help you with? Take a look at the charts below to find foot areas you can apply self reflexology to.

Resources

Kunz K, Kunz B. Can Reflexology Help Me? 2010.

Kunz K, Kunz B. Reflexology Research, In Brief. 2004.

Lingyun Y, et al. Observation on Improvement of Feeble-Minded Children’s Social Abilities by Foot Reflexo-Therapy. 1998 China Reflexology Symposium Report . 1998;24-28.

Zhongzheng L, Yuchun L. Clinical observation on Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease with Foot Reflexotherapy. 1998 China Reflexology Symposium Report . 1998;38-41

Foot Reflexology Chart 1Foot Reflexology Chart 2

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Comments

  1. Vicki Tessitore says

    I had Plantar Fasciitis for 1 1/2 years ( getting a cortizone shot 6 months into it), saw the doctor 4 timesand had 2 xrays, that were negative for any broken bones. As of April this year the pain started moving to the top and outside of my right foot,and seems to be moving up the calf. I have great hopes this will help. I also ordered the Heal n Soothe thinking this might help also…I will let you know!!!
    Vicki

  2. Jesse Cannone says

    Yes, Heal-n-Soothe will likely help a lot.. but one other thing to consider is excess calcium… be sure to listen to my interview with Dr. Thompson about this. Search this blog for it.

  3. Pam says

    I have chronic neck pain on my right side and goes up into my head and shoulder.

    Where it the points that I can massage to relieve the pain

  4. jennifer says

    I have had severe arm/shoulder pain for about 12 months (getting progressively worse, and tightness in the neck/shoulder blade and lower back. Acup, chiro, cranio-sacral and heal and soothe have done nothing. I’m wondering if it might be a food intolerance reaction. what do you think? I started a yeast free diet this week and imagined it was improving, then I had a heavy exposure to mould and the next day the pain was debilitating and I was an emotional wreck. I’m unsure if you would recommend the neck program or back as I have both but primarily the shoulders and mid thoracic area. Any suggestions?

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